anpet2000

Education and Eating Disorders: 5 Challenges and 5 Strategies

Students with eating disorders often develop a complicated relationship between their education and their health. On campuses, comparisons among peers (of both appearance and academic standing) and high performance expectations breed perfectionism, a hallmark quality for many eating disorders. It’s both normal and encouraged to prioritize academic achievement over sleep, food, and other self-caring activities.
ITLPhoto

Siblings and Eating Disorder Recovery (Part 2)

It can be confusing, sad, scary, and frustrating to live with a sibling who has an eating disorder. You may not know how to talk to them, or how to take care of yourself during the stressful stages of their treatment and recovery. Consider the following tips from individuals who have successfully navigated the eating disorder recovery journey with their siblings.

Siblings and Eating Disorder Recovery (Part 1)

When an adolescent is diagnosed with an eating disorder, it is not just that child’s issue. Rather, an eating disorder is often considered a reflection of larger family dysfunction that has just most prominently manifested in one member. Understandably, much attention and energy is given to the diagnosed child.

The Realities of Eating Disorder Recovery: A Recovered Provider’s Story

Prior to becoming a psychotherapist and recovery coach at Eating Disorder Recovery Specialists (EDRS), Whitney McMullan was treated for an eating disorder herself. She never imagined she would eventually enter the field of eating disorder treatment as a provider, but now cherishes the benefits—for both herself and her clients—of her first-hand understanding.

How Can I Support Someone With an Eating Disorder?

Whether you are a family member, partner, close friend, or professional treatment provider, consider these insights when offering care to someone in eating disorder recovery. Here are 5 tips for caregivers.
Mujidat Shotonwa

Considering Culture in Eating Disorder Recovery: An Interview with Mujidat Shotonwa, MHC-LP

For Mujidat, helping to facilitate a client’s recovery from the position of Intake Coordinator generates “a really good feeling for me, because it feels like I am part of pieces that are coming together.”
Markin

Eating Disorders Among College-Aged Males: What Helps? (Part 2)

Despite the pervasive masculinity ideal and inadequate resources on campuses for males who struggle with body and food issues (link to previous piece), there are effective ways to counteract the compulsive exercise and disordered eating habits which so many male students adopt.
Czamfir

Writing Your Way To Wellness: Narrative Practice for Eating Disorder Recovery

Research shows that writing not only improves one’s emotional health, but it has physiologically benefits. Since the 1980s, numerous studies conducted by psychologist James W. Pennebaker, PhD, have proven the that writing about stressful emotions has significant positive effects on individuals coping with diseases, disorders, and trauma.
Maridav

Eating Disorders: The Challenges Among College-Aged Males (Part 1)

Males face unique challenges when seeking support for eating disorder recovery. They often are up against greater stigma than women, have fewer treatment options available, and struggle to find male peers going through similar experiences.
Maiken Wiese, Eating Disorder Specialist

Facing the Food in Eating Disorder Recovery: An Interview with Maiken Wiese, RD

What does it take to recover from an eating disorder? Nutritional, physical, psychological, and emotional needs must be addressed, so it helps to have a variety of professionals comprise a “treatment team.” One essential player on this team is a Registered Dietitian (RD): a health professional with an accredited university degree in nutrition and dietetics who has completed supervised hours of clinical practice and passed a credentialing exam. But not all RD’s specialize in eating disorders.