Diana Wright

Partnering on the Eating Disorder Recovery Journey: An Interview with Diana Wright, MS RD

As Diana grew up, she was exposed to unhealthy attitudes about food and body image in the world of competitive dance. “I was around eating disorders and disordered eating way more than I realized,” she said. This exposure, in combination with her love and passion for food, cooking, and science, inspired her to pursue a career in nutrition, and Diana eventually became a Registered Dietitian (RD).
Supportive Couple

Supporting a Loved One in Eating Disorder Recovery During the Holidays

Two hallmarks of the winter holiday season are spending time with family and partaking in festive feasts. For individuals working on recovery from an eating disorder, both of these aspects can present quite a challenge. It can also be confusing and frustrating for family members and friends of someone in recovery as they try to support them at this time.
Martinan

Taking Care Of Yourself Impacts Their Recovery: 5 Self-Care Tips for Caregivers

Watching someone struggle with an eating disorder can be immensely stressful, scary, and frustrating. Because you care deeply about that person, you may find yourself taking on a caregiving role.
zsirosistvan

Love Your Body Day and Eating Disorder Recovery

For individuals struggling with eating disorders, loving your body may seem like a nice idea, but out of reach. It may be hard enough to fuel your body with the food it needs, let alone give it love. But really, feeding yourself appropriately is an act of love, and a celebration of your body and yourself.
Wavebreak Media Ltd

Working with A Recovered Coach: Advice for Clients in Eating Disorder Recovery

Increasingly, eating disorder recovery coaches are opening up to clients about their own experience healing from an eating disorder. Such transparency in eating disorder treatment is a relatively new phenomenon--and it’s gaining momentum, as coaches modeling that recovery is possible has proven to be notably beneficial for many clients.
Czamfir

Writing Your Way To Wellness: Narrative Practice for Eating Disorder Recovery

Research shows that writing not only improves one’s emotional health, but it has physiologically benefits. Since the 1980s, numerous studies conducted by psychologist James W. Pennebaker, PhD, have proven the that writing about stressful emotions has significant positive effects on individuals coping with diseases, disorders, and trauma.
Maiken Wiese, Eating Disorder Specialist

Facing the Food in Eating Disorder Recovery: An Interview with Maiken Wiese, RD

What does it take to recover from an eating disorder? Nutritional, physical, psychological, and emotional needs must be addressed, so it helps to have a variety of professionals comprise a “treatment team.” One essential player on this team is a Registered Dietitian (RD): a health professional with an accredited university degree in nutrition and dietetics who has completed supervised hours of clinical practice and passed a credentialing exam. But not all RD’s specialize in eating disorders.
Female College Student on campus

How to Overcome an Eating Disorder at College

A multitude of factors contribute to the rising rates of eating disorders diagnosed at this stage of life. As exciting as college may be, it also involves new levels and types of stress: greater academic expectations, pressure to determine your identity, increased athletic competitiveness, new social networks, more independent living, unfamiliar food sources and settings, loss of childhood, and the challenges of transition…to name a few!
girl in high grass on a sunny day. self-compassion

Cultivating Self-Compassion in Eating Disorder Recovery

I recently asked a friend who is in recovery from anorexia how she feels towards her now inactive but once powerful eating disorder. Squinting past my shoulder into the distance—perhaps into her distant past—she paused in silent reflection. Several moments later, she returned to the here and now, and responded:
Hand in Forgiveness

Forgiveness: A Practice for Healing

Forgiveness is an essential part of recovery because, as Desmond Tutu says, “The only way to experience healing and peace is to forgive. Until we can forgive, we remain locked in our pain and locked out of the possibility of experiencing healing and freedom.”